October–December 2016


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Becoming The Head Priorities in Adventist Education

As an educator, what would you do with a blank check? Would you ask for a new building? For more students? For needed faculty? For a large endowment? What would you request?

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Education for What? Thoughts on the Purpose and Identity of Adventist Education

Nothing can be more important in a free society than the clear statement of goals for education.”1 So wrote Millicent McIntosh in the first sentence of her booklet Education for What?

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Schools of the Bible: Contours of the Divine Plan for Education

Does God have a plan for education? If so, might the educational programs He has established throughout the Bible communicate essential features of this model?

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Scriptural Foundations for Academic Disciplines: A Biblical Theme Approach

Through its grand themes, the Bible presents a foundation for learning in all disci­plines.1 Biblical themes are as applicable to professional training programs as to learning in the humanities, sciences, the arts, and technical/vocational areas.

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A Biblical Foundation Course Design Model That Works: Teaching Millennials in Higher Education

Based on conversations with a cross-section of Seventh-day Adventist students attending the denomination’s colleges and universities, the authors learned that these millennials are looking to be engaged, and they want our Adventist biblical worldview to be prevalent throughout all their courses.

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Teaching Biology in the Light of Creation

Biology, the study of life and of living organisms, is one of the most exciting subjects in the sciences. Here, among other things, the student learns how cells and organisms function on the molecular, cellular, and ecological levels of organization. This knowledge is foundational for all health sciences and for nutrition.

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Flexible and Alternative Seating in Classrooms

Much about schooling has changed since the 1800s. The curricula, seating configurations, and discipline methods have changed; and so have books, tech­nology, and many other resources. Unfortunately, one thing has not changed: the amount of time young students are required to sit in the same chair.

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